Seek Wisdom and Pursue It

Fasting is only one of the Lenten disciplines. The Holy Tradition counsels us to regularize and intensify our discipline of reading and reflecting on Scripture and the lives and writings of the saints. In so doing, we are seeking to acquire not, primarily, more information but the very mind of Christ Jesus.

Jesus was very serious not just about repentance but also about illumination – knowing, understanding.

So, we seek not only to repent, but also to realize that the repenting is really also a “coming to know.” And, in accordance with the desire of our Lord, to live out the wisdom He shares with us.

The result, of the operation of both repentance and illumination, as I have said before, is the increase of love. The keeping of the greatest commandment. Jesus said that people would know we are His disciples by the love we have for one another (John 13.35). This lived love is the wise life – the illumined life.

So, the desire for knowing something and living it out are really inseparable. The knowing and the doing. The wise woman or man is one for whom this is recognizably true. Thy have been reduced to love. They have devoted themselves to the Apostles teaching, among other things, and the foolishness and delusion of the self-full life has been crucified. This journey of being crucified with Christ of their foolishness and delusion was powerful and courageous wisdom. What has been raised up and set free to live in this world, for the sake of this world, is the new woman or man in Christ Jesus.

These are the women and men who are sought out by those who desire authentic life, fullness of life. The life of the wise one speaks (Psalm 51.6, 10, 13). It is a witness of “being wisdom bearing the fruit of behaving wisely.”

This is the Christ-life by grace, the wise life is foolishness to the world. And, of course, this is the hard choice. Choose this day (and everyday), wisdom or folly. Die to folly; be born and grow up into and as wisdom.

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3 Do not let kindness and truth leave you;
Bind them around your neck,
Write them on the tablet of your heart.

4 So you will find favor and good repute
In the sight of God and man.

5 Trust in the LORD with all your heart
And do not lean on your own understanding.

6 In all your ways acknowledge Him,
And He will make your paths straight.

7 Do not be wise in your own eyes;
Fear the LORD and turn away from evil.

8 It will be healing to your body
And refreshment to your bones. (Proverbs 3.3-8)

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2 Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, 3 knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. 4 And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing. 5 But if any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all generously and without reproach, and it will be given to him. 6 But he must ask in faith without any doubting, for the one who doubts is like the surf of the sea, driven and tossed by the wind. 7 For that man ought not to expect that he will receive anything from the Lord, 8being a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways. (James 1.2-7)

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Our hearts must constantly dwell on the thought of wisdom, our lips repeat its lessons. Let your tongue pronounce right judgements and the law of your God be in your heart. This is the way to understand that verse of Scripture: You shall speak of these things when you sit in your house and when you walk along the way, and when you rise. Let us, then, speak of the Lord Jesus, for Jesus is wisdom in person; he is the Word, the very word of God.

There is another text that says: Open your mouth and let it be filled with God’s word. To be filled with God’s word is to repeat Christ’s message and dwell continually upon his teaching. Christ should always be the theme of our conversation. Whenever we speak of wisdom, we are speaking of Christ. When we speak of virtue, it is of Christ we speak. When we discuss justice or peace, we are discussing Christ and when our talk is of truth and life and redemption, Christ is our subject, for he is a­ll these things.

Open your mouth, Scripture says, and let it be filled with God’s ­word. You must do the opening, but it is God who makes his voice heard. That is why David said: I will hear what the Lord says ­in my heart, and the invitation: Open your mouth and I will fill it is made by the Son of God himself. Not everyone can arrive at the perfection of wisdom that Solomon or Daniel attained, but upon all of us, according to our capacity, the Spirit of wisdom is ­poured out, provided we have faith. If you believe, you possess the Spirit of wisdom, and faith gives you the grace to speak out.

As you sit in your house, then, meditate unceasingly on the things of God and make them the subject of your discourse. By house we can understand either the Church or that secret place in our hearts where we commune with ourselves. Choose your words prudently for fear of sin and beware of falling through overmuch talk. Speak too when you are walking along the way, so as never to be idle; and as you walk speak now to yourself, now to ­Christ. How should you address him? Listen to what Scripture says: I ­desire that the men should pray in every place, lifting their hands in reverence, without anger or quarrelling.

Speak also, my friend, when you lie down, or the sleep of death may steal upon you. Be instructed once more by Scripture: I will not give sleep to my eyes nor allow my eyelids to slumber until I find a place for the Lord, a dwelling place for the God of Jacob. Overcome your natural inclinations and shorten the time you give to sleep, like David who kept the Lord in mind as he lay on his bed, waking early in order to hear Christ’s voice and perceive his light in the darkness. Do not wait for Christ to wake you; it is you who should rouse him by cherishing the thought of him even during sleep. If you do this, he himself will rouse you from slumber and wake you from the sleep of death. Speak of him then, when you rise, whether it is from your bed or from the grave, and so fulfil what the word of God commands. Source: St. Ambrose, In psalmis 36.65-66 (CSEL 64:123-125); from Word in Season II, 1st ed.

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